Priscilla Day

priscilla Priscilla A. Day, Anishinaabe, MSW, Ed.D. is an enrolled member of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe from the Leech Lake Reservation. Day received her Bachelor’s degree from Bemidji State University, her MSW in 1991 from the University of Minnesota Duluth and her Ed.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1999. She is the mother of three adult children. She is active on her home reservation and in 2009 was appointed by the Tribal Council as Chair of the Leech Lake Tribal College Board of Trustees.

Day is a professor in the Department of Social Work at the University of Minnesota Duluth where she has worked for 17 years. In 2006, she became the Principal Investigator and Director for the Center for Regional and Child Welfare Studies that offers students scholarships to train and work in the field of child welfare.

Dr. Day co-created a model of diversity education called "Cross Cultural Explorations: Learning Circles" that is offered as an elective in her department of social work. She has done numerous presentations on cultural competence including indigenous cultural competence, organizational cultural competence, and working effectively with diverse groups. Her research, “What does it take to raise a healthy Anishinaabe child?” can be found at
Raising Healthy Anishinaabeg Children.

Day is a member of the Council of Social Work Educators (CSWE) and served on its Board of Directors from 2002-2005. She is a member of the American Indian/Alaska Native CSWE Task Force which produced a report she co-presented to the CSWE Board of Directors, Fall 2009, on the status of American Indian/Alaska Natives in social work education. She is continuing to work on the recommendations in hopes of increasing the numbers of American Indian/Alaska Natives that choose social work and social work education as a career. She is a member and co-president of the American Indian/Alaska Native Social Work Educators.

Day’s awards include the “Significant Achievements” TRIO Award that honors those who have made significant lifetime achievements and the "Woman of Distinction" Leadership Award given by the YWCA of Duluth Minnesota to honor women who have made significant contributions to the Duluth community and region.

She has written numerous articles on issues related to American Indian families. Two of her recent works are book chapters

Day PA,
American Indian Elders in Nursing Homes” in Social Work Practice with Ethnically and Racially Diverse Nursing Home Residents and Their Families, Patricia Kolb, Editor, Columbia Press, New York, NY, 2007

Day PA, “Leadership from an American Indian Perspective” in
Women of Color on the Rise: Leadership and Administration in Social Work Education.
Halaevalu F.Ofahengaue Vakalahi, & Wilma Peebles-Wilkens, Editors, Columbia University Press. New York, NY, 2009.

Several of Dr. Day’s publications are available through the University of Minnesota Duluth Department of Social Work website:

Day PA, (2007). American Indian Elders. In P. J. Kolb, (Ed.), Social Work Practice with Ethnically and Racially Diverse Nursing Home Residents and Their Families (pp. 41-71). New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Tellett A & Day PA (2008).
“Creating University and Tribal Community Collaborations”,
http://www.bemaadizing.org/2008/04/21/creating-university-and-tribal-community-collaborations/

Day PA, & Tellett A. Minnesota Anishinaabe: Nations and People-An Information and Resource Manual. Department of Social Work, University of Minnesota-Duluth, MN, 2002. (http://www.d.umn.edu/sw/cw/cc/AmericanIndianContent.html)

Day, PA., A Guide to Cultural Competency, Department of Social Work, University of Minnesota-Duluth, Duluth, MN, 1994. http://www.d.umn.edu/sw/culturalcomp/culcomp.html